Endurance: outlet online sale My online sale Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery outlet sale

Endurance: outlet online sale My online sale Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery outlet sale

Endurance: outlet online sale My online sale Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery outlet sale

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NATIONAL BESTSELLER

The veteran of four space flights and the American record holder for consecutive days spent in space, Scott Kelly has experienced things very few have. Now, he takes us inside a sphere utterly hostile to human life. He describes navigating the extreme challenges of long-term spaceflight—the devastating effects on the body, the isolation from everyone he loves and the comforts of Earth, the pressures of constant close cohabitation, and the catastrophic risks of depressurization or colliding with space junk. But perhaps the most haunting challenge is that of being unable to help should tragedy strike at home, something Kelly knows about firsthand.

Kelly''s humanity, compassion, humor, and passion resonate throughout, as he recalls his rough-and-tumble New Jersey childhood and the youthful inspiration that sparked his astounding career. Here, in his personal story, we see the triumph of the human imagination, the strength of the human will, and the infinite wonder of the galaxy.

Review

“Captivating, charming . . . . [Kelly] pulls back the curtain separating the myth of the astronaut from its human realities. . . . It is easy to imagine future generations of explorers and daredevils harnessing the lessons and truths within the pages of ‘Endurance’ as the blueprints for their own trips into the unknown.” —Jaroslav Kalfar, The New York Times Book Review

[Endurance] is a memoir of the right stuff that will hypnotize any space geek.” — The Wall Street Journal

Kelly brings life in space alive—the wonder and awe of it, and also the jagged edges, the rough parts of living in confined quarters in an alien element, far from everything familiar and beloved. . . . Endurance, with its honest, gritty descriptions of an unimaginable life, a year off Earth, is as close as most readers will come to making that voyage themselves.” — The Financial Times

“Kelly’s account is insightful, at times humorous, heart-tugging at others. And it’s inspiring enough to change the life of some lost kid, just like  The Right Stuff did for him.” — USA Today

“For space junkies, it’s absolutely required reading. . . . We feel as though we’re right there with him. A great book.” — Booklist

“Scott Kelly’s saga is a deeply absorbing and vivid look at a year in space and the many trials and rigors of living weightless inside a football field-sized machine traveling at 17,000 miles per hour. But  Endurance satisfies far more than the reader’s technological curiosities; it is replete with humor, thrills, surreal details, and recurring moments of ordinary humanity that turn Kelly’s tale into a loving tribute to the pioneering individuals who risk all to shepherd man’s exploration of the vast beyond.” —Khaled Hosseini, author of  And the Mountains Echoed

“Read this book and you will believe in our American future, thrill at our human potential, and laugh at the absurdities of life.   Endurance is about excellence and perspective, a memorable read.”  Senator Bill Bradley

“This isn’t your usual astronaut’s memoir.” The Philadelphia Tribune

“Scott Kelly’s book is as close as I and most everyone else on Earth will ever get to experiencing the fascinating, complex, almost preposterously dangerous business of going into space. When I closed the covers, I felt like I had been out there. Endurance is an utterly gripping book that can stand comfortably in the company of Tom Wolfe’s The Right Stuff.” —Charles C. Mann, author of 1491

“Scott Kelly’s memoir of his year in space and all that preceded it is the real thing—honest, dramatic, illuminating, and simply riveting. With clear, compelling writing, he reveals the nature of space exploration, the current state of the space program, and the raw experience of leaving Earth as has no other book.” —T.J. Stiles, author of Custer’s Trials

About the Author

SCOTT KELLY is a former military fighter pilot and test pilot, an engineer, a retired astronaut, and a retired U.S. Navy captain. A veteran of four space flights, Kelly commanded the International Space Station (ISS) on three expeditions and was a member of the yearlong mission to the ISS. During the Year in Space mission, he set records for the total accumulated number of days spent in space and for the single longest space mission by an American astronaut. He lives in Houston, Texas.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Prologue

I’m sitting at the head of my dining room table at home in Houston, finishing dinner with my family: my longtime girlfriend, Amiko; my daughters, Samantha and Charlotte; my twin brother, Mark; his wife, Gabby; his daughter, Claudia; our father, Richie; and Amiko’s son, Corbin. It’s a simple thing, sitting at a table and eating a meal with those you love, and many people do it every day without giving it much thought. For me, it’s something I’ve been dreaming of for almost a year. I contemplated what it would be like to eat this meal so many times, now that I’m finally here, it doesn’t seem entirely real. The faces of the people I love that I haven’t seen for so long, the chatter of many people talking together, the clink of silverware, the swish of wine in a glass—these are all unfamiliar. Even the sensation of gravity holding me in my chair feels strange, and every time I put a glass or fork down on the table there’s a part of my mind that is looking for a dot of Velcro or a strip of duct tape to hold it in place. I’ve been back on Earth for forty-eight hours.

I push back from the table and struggle to stand up, feeling like an old man getting out of a recliner.

“Stick a fork in me, I’m done,” I announce. Everyone laughs and encourages me to go and get some rest. I start the journey to my bedroom: about twenty steps from the chair to the bed. On the third step, the floor seems to lurch under me, and I stumble into a planter. Of course it wasn’t the floor—it was my vestibular system trying to readjust to Earth’s gravity. I’m getting used to walking again.

“That’s the first time I’ve seen you stumble,” Mark says. “You’re doing pretty good.” He knows from personal experience what it’s like to come back to gravity after having been in space. As I walk by Samantha, I put my hand on her shoulder and she smiles up at me.

I make it to my bedroom without incident and close the door behind me. Every part of my body hurts. All of my joints and all of my muscles are protesting the crushing pressure of gravity. I’m also nauseated, though I haven’t thrown up. I strip off my clothes and get into bed, relishing the feeling of sheets, the light pressure of the blanket over me, the fluff of the pillow under my head. All of these are things I missed dearly. I can hear the happy murmur of my family behind the door, voices I haven’t heard without the distortion of phones bouncing signals off satellites for a year. I drift off to sleep to the comforting sound of their talking and laughing.

A crack of light wakes me: Is it morning? No, it’s just Amiko coming to bed. I’ve only been asleep for a couple of hours. But I feel delirious. It’s a struggle to come to consciousness enough to move, to tell her how awful I feel. I’m seriously nauseated now, feverish, and my pain has gotten worse. This isn’t like how I felt after my last mission. This is much, much worse.

“Amiko,” I finally manage to say.

She is alarmed by the sound of my voice.

“What is it?” Her hand is on my arm, then on my forehead. Her skin feels chilled, but it’s just that I’m so hot.

“I don’t feel good,” I say.

I’ve been to space four times now, and she has gone through the whole process with me as my main support once before, when I spent 159 days on the space station in 2010–11. I had a reaction to coming back from space that time, but it was nothing like this.

I struggle to get up. Find the edge of the bed. Feet down. Sit up. Stand up. At every stage I feel like I’m fighting through quicksand. When I’m finally vertical, the pain in my legs is awful, and on top of that pain I feel something even more alarming: all the blood in my body is rushing to my legs, like the sensation of the blood rushing to your head when you do a headstand, but in reverse. I can feel the tissue in my legs swelling. I shuffle my way to the bathroom, moving my weight from one foot to the other with deliberate effort. Left. Right. Left. Right.

I make it to the bathroom, flip on the light, and look down at my legs. They are swollen and alien stumps, not legs at all.

“Oh, shit,” I say. “Amiko, come look at this.”

She kneels down and squeezes one ankle, and it squishes like a water balloon. She looks up at me with worried eyes. “I can’t even feel your anklebones,” she says.

“My skin is burning, too,” I tell her. Amiko frantically examines me. I have a strange rash all over my back, the backs of my legs, the back of my head and neck—everywhere I was in contact with the bed. I can feel her cool hands moving over my inflamed skin. “It looks like an allergic rash,” she says. “Like hives.”

I use the bathroom and shuffle back to bed, wondering what I should do. Normally if I woke up feeling like this, I would go to the emergency room, but no one at the hospital will have seen symptoms of having been in space for a year. I crawl back into bed, trying to find a way to lie down without touching my rash. I can hear Amiko rummaging in the medicine cabinet. She comes back with two ibuprofen and a glass of water. As she settles down, I can tell from her every movement, every breath, that she is worried about me. We both knew the risks of the mission I signed on for. After six years together, I can understand her perfectly even in the wordless dark.

As I try to will myself to sleep, I wonder whether my friend Mikhail Kornienko is also suffering from swollen legs and painful rashes— Misha is home in Moscow after spending nearly a year in space with me. I suspect so. This is why we volunteered for this mission, after all: to discover how the human body is affected by long-term space flight. Scientists will study the data on Misha and me for the rest of our lives and beyond. Our space agencies won’t be able to push out farther into space, to a destination like Mars, until we can learn more about how to strengthen the weakest links in the chain that makes space flight possible: the human body and mind. People often ask me why I volunteered for this mission, knowing the risks—the risk of launch, the risk inherent in spacewalks, the risk of returning to Earth, the risk I would be exposed to every moment I lived in a metal container orbiting the Earth at 17,500 miles per hour. I have a few answers I give to this question, but none of them feels fully satisfying to me. None of them quite answers it.
 

When I was a boy, I had a strange recurring daydream. I saw myself confined to a small space, barely big enough to lie down in. Curled up on the floor, I knew that I would be there for a long time. I couldn’t leave, but I didn’t mind—I had the feeling I had everything I needed. Something about that small space, the sense that I was doing something challenging just by living there, was appealing to me. I felt I was where I belonged.

One night when I was five, my parents shook Mark and me awake and hustled us down to the living room to watch a blurry gray image on TV, which they explained was men walking on the moon. I remember hearing the staticky voice of Neil Armstrong and trying to make sense of the outrageous claim that he was visiting the glowing disc in the New Jersey summer sky I could see out our window. Watching the moon landing left me with a strange recurring nightmare: I dreamed I was preparing to launch on a rocket to the moon, but rather than being secured safely in a seat inside, I was instead strapped across the pointy end of the rocket, my back against its nose cone, facing straight up at the heavens. The moon loomed over me, its giant craters threatening, as I waited through the countdown. I knew I couldn’t possibly survive the moment of ignition. Every time I had this dream, I woke up, sweating and terrified, just before the engines burned their fire into the sky.

As a kid, I took all the risks I could, not because I was foolhardy but because everything else was boring. I threw myself off things, crawled under things, took dares from other boys, skated and slid and swam and capsized, sometimes tempting death. Mark and I climbed up drainpipes starting when we were six, waving back down at our parents from roofs two or three stories up. Attempting something difficult was the only way to live. If you were doing something safe, something you already knew could be done, you were wasting time. I found it bewildering that some people my age could just sit still, breathing and blinking, for entire school days—that they could resist the urge to run outside, to take off exploring, to do something new, to take risks. What went through their heads? What could they learn in a classroom that could even approach the feeling of flying down a hill out of control on a bike?

I was a terrible student, always staring out windows or looking at the clock, waiting for class to be over. My teachers scolded, then chastised, then finally—some of them—ignored me. My parents, a cop and a secretary, tried unsuccessfully to discipline my brother and me. Neither of us listened. We were on our own much of the time—after school, while our parents were still at work, and on weekend mornings, when our parents were sleeping off a hangover. We were free to do what we liked, and what we liked was to take risks.

During my high school years, for the first time I found something I was good at that adults approved of: I worked as an emergency medical technician. When I took the EMT classes, I discovered that I had the patience to sit down and study. I started as a volunteer and in a few years worked my way up to a full-time job. I rode in an ambulance all night, never knowing what I would face next—gunshot wounds, heart attacks, broken bones. Once I delivered a baby in a public housing project, the mother in a rancid bed with old unwashed sheets, a single naked lightbulb swinging overhead, dirty dishes piled in the sink. The heart-pounding feeling of walking into a potentially dangerous situation and having to depend on my wits was intoxicating. I was dealing with life-and-death situations, not boring—and, to me, pointless— classroom subjects. In the morning, I often drove home and went to sleep instead of going to school.

I managed to graduate from high school, in the bottom half of my class. I went to the only college I was accepted to (which was a different college than the one I had meant to apply to—such were my powers of concentration). There, I had no more interest in schoolwork than I’d had in high school, and I was also getting too old to jump off things for fun. Partying took the place of physical risk, but it wasn’t as satisfying. When asked by adults, I said I wanted to be a doctor. I’d signed up for premed classes but was failing them in my first semester. I knew I was just marking time until I’d be told I would have to do something else, and I had no idea what that would be.

One day I walked into the campus bookstore to buy snacks, and a display caught my eye. The letters on the book’s cover seemed to streak into the future with unstoppable speed: The Right Stuff. I wasn’t much of a reader—whenever I was assigned to read a book for school, I would barely flip through it, hopelessly bored. Sometimes I’d look at the CliffsNotes and remember enough of what I read to pass a test on the book, sometimes not. I had not read many books by choice in my entire life—but this book somehow drew me to it.

I picked up a copy, and its first sentences dropped me into the stench of a smoky field at the naval air station in Jacksonville, Florida, where a young test pilot had just been killed and burned beyond recognition. He had crashed his airplane into a tree, which “knocked [his] head to pieces like a melon.” The scene captured my attention like nothing else I had ever read. Something about this was deeply familiar, though I couldn’t say what.

I bought the book and lay on my unmade dorm room bed reading it for the rest of the day, heart pounding, Tom Wolfe’s hyperactive, looping sentences ringing in my head. I was captivated by the description of the Navy test pilots, young hotshots catapulting off aircraft carriers, testing unstable airplanes, drinking hard, and generally moving through the world like exceptional badasses.

The idea here (in the all-enclosing fraternity) seemed to be that a man should have the ability to go up in a hurtling piece of machinery and put his hide on the line and then have the moxie, the reflexes, the experience, the coolness, to pull it back in the last yawning moment—and then to go up again the next day, and the next day, and every next day, even if the series should prove infinite—and, ultimately, in its best expression, do so in a cause that means something to thousands, to a people, a nation, to humanity, to God.

This wasn’t just an exciting adventure story. This was something more like a life plan. These young men, flying jets in the Navy, did a real job that existed in the real world. Some of them became astronauts, and that was a real job too. These were hard jobs to get, I understood, but some people did get them. It could be done. What drew me to these Navy pilots wasn’t the idea of the “right stuff”—a special quality these few brave men had—it was the idea of doing something immensely difficult, risking your life for it, and surviving. It was like a night run in the ambulance, but at the speed of sound. The adults around me who encouraged me to become a doctor thought I liked being an EMT because I liked taking people’s blood pressure measurements, stabilizing broken bones, and helping people. But what I craved about the ambulance was the excitement, the difficulty, the unknown, the risk. Here, in a book, I found something I’d thought I would never find: an ambition. I closed the book late that night a different person.

I would be asked many times over the following decades what the beginning of my career as an astronaut was, and I would talk about seeing the moon landing as a kid, or seeing the first shuttle launch. These answers were to some extent true. I never told the story about an eighteen-year-old boy in a tiny, stuffy dorm room, enthralled by swirling sentences describing long-dead pilots. That was the real beginning.
 

When I became an astronaut and started getting to know my astronaut classmates, many of us shared the same memory of coming downstairs in our pajamas as little kids to watch the moon landing. Most of them had decided, then and there, to go to space one day. At the time, we were promised that Americans would land on the surface of Mars by 1975, when I was eleven. Everything was possible now that we had put a man on the moon. Then NASA lost most of its funding, and our dreams of space were downgraded over the decades. Yet my astronaut class was told we would be the first to go to Mars, and we believed it so fully that we put it on the class patch we wore on our flight jackets, a little red planet rising above the moon and the Earth. Since then, NASA has accomplished the assembly of the International Space Station, the hardest thing human beings have ever achieved. Getting to Mars and back will be even harder, and I have spent a year in space— longer than it would take to get to Mars—to help answer some of the questions about how we can survive that journey.

The risk taking of my youth is still with me. My childhood memories are of the uncontrollable forces of physics, the dream of climbing higher, the danger of gravity. For an astronaut, those memories are unsettling in one way but comforting in another. Every time I took a risk, I lived to draw breath again. Every time I got myself into trouble, I made it out alive.

Most of the way through my yearlong mission, I was thinking about how much The Right Stuff had meant to me, and I decided to call Tom Wolfe; I thought he might enjoy getting a call from space. Among the other things we talked about, I asked him how he writes his books, how I might start to think about putting my experiences into words.

“Begin at the beginning,” he said, and so I will.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Rena
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mixed response to this but still a good read.
Reviewed in the United States on December 28, 2017
I have two paths of reaction to this book. On the one hand, it was extremely interesting to read a first hand account of the path to being an astronaut -- the educational path, the selection process, the training. Also that there are different paths that impact one''s... See more
I have two paths of reaction to this book. On the one hand, it was extremely interesting to read a first hand account of the path to being an astronaut -- the educational path, the selection process, the training. Also that there are different paths that impact one''s interest and role in space: test pilot vs. scientist. I was truly ignorant without a thought about the differences between the space shuttle era, and the space station era. I didn''t know anything about the space station or it''s development until reading this, nor did I have any interest at all. But after reading this book I spent a few hours watching every video I could find that toured the space station, or demonstrated how astronauts do everyday tasks in space. It was generally a great read, and very engaging -- and we''re talking about a reader who generally isn''t interested in space. There were a few places where it got bogged down in the technical; and the pattern of alternating chapters of different time periods was distracting. I would have enjoyed it more were it linear.

So that was the good part of the book, and why I recommend it. What I didn''t like was the impression I was left with about Scott Kelly himself, and some personal choices he made in the book. I was pre-disposed to like him, but walked away not liking him (dislike might be strong). What bothered me were his comments about his first wife, and not wanting to marry her; as well as subsequent negative comments about her. True or not, it really wasn''t necessary to share this -- it had no connection to the rest of the story, and wasn''t necessary for explaining their eventual divorce. I could only think of his daughters -- who aren''t that old (the oldest was a teenager during the narrative) -- reading this. It may be true, but not something you want to read in print about your parents along with a million other people. (And his attempts as times to make positive comments about her seem really forced -- you can''t un-ring a bell.) So he chose to share all of that, but then the Lisa Nowak matter is weirdly handled -- or not handled. She was a classmate, coworker, and someone he knew for a long time. He makes a couple comments about her being obsessive, and getting her moved to another flight team. But the books skips over a big period of time and conveniently does not address her "trip to Florida." It also does not cover his public comments in the aftermath regarding alcohol use among astronauts. Even if for some reason he (or the editor, or legal) didn''t want to go into the entire saga, it''s weird to pretend like it didn''t happen given everything else that was covered. At least an acknowledgement of some kind would have made sense. At any rate, while the editorial decision about the omission might have been someone else''s, the editorial decision about including such negative comments about his first wife were his.
109 people found this helpful
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John B. Frick
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disapppointed
Reviewed in the United States on January 5, 2019
I was looking forward to this book a great deal as I find space travel and the heroes that undertake such challenges to be fascinating. While I enjoyed the way the book flowed (back and forth between his time on the ISS and the path in his life that made that possible, I... See more
I was looking forward to this book a great deal as I find space travel and the heroes that undertake such challenges to be fascinating. While I enjoyed the way the book flowed (back and forth between his time on the ISS and the path in his life that made that possible, I was very disappointed in two things. First, the language. There was no need for Mr. Kelly to share his frequent use of the "F word" in almost all chapters of the book. Doing so did very little to enhance the story that he was telling.

Also, he seemed unusually focused on the difficulties of going to the bathroom in space. Again, in almost every chapter of the book dealing with his multiple times on the ISS, Mr, Kelly goes into nauseating detail about how many times the waste elimination system broke and how long it took him to fix it.

This book would have been great had Mr. Kelly put some of his attitude and ego in check and focused more on the people and overall technology necessary for his successful time in space.

I will keep the book on my bookshelf, but there it shall live. Probably never to be loaned to friends.
31 people found this helpful
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Kristine S. Woeckener
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Arrogant Guy Talks About His Greatness
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2019
The author begins the book with an introduction that left me absolutely hating his arrogant, conceited self. I forced myself to continue because I figured at least he would talk about space, and who could ruin that? Kelly can, that''s who. He makes the International Space... See more
The author begins the book with an introduction that left me absolutely hating his arrogant, conceited self. I forced myself to continue because I figured at least he would talk about space, and who could ruin that? Kelly can, that''s who. He makes the International Space Station sound like dull, tedious work. NASA is a taskmaster that does not put the well-being of the astronauts first when it comes to CO2 levels or down time. The author complains a lot. He also has at least an implied brag about everything he does, even his mistakes (which aren''t many). He constantly plays up the dangers and what a brave guy he is. On the one hand, it IS a dangerous job and he IS courageous. On the other, his memoir is at its best when he does not clobber the reader over the head with his superiority. That sense of greatness is ironic given that Kelly was a terrible student. NASA seems to want to dispel the idea that it only chooses the best of the best. The author makes it out like he just slid into being a pilot and astronaut with no problem. That makes me hate him. I would rather read about someone who was hard-working and appreciative of his/her success than Mr. Right Stuff/Top Gun here. That said, he does talk enough about space to make this book okay.
13 people found this helpful
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Hal
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Exceptional book!
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2017
As riveting as a Tom Clancy novel with this being the real thing. I read it in two sittings. One of the best books I''ve read in years.
18 people found this helpful
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Dan Burke
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Riveting Bio of a Preeminent Astronaut!
Reviewed in the United States on November 13, 2017
Great book by one of the most experienced astronauts! Scott has so much to tell, and I enjoyed all of the details of life in space aboard the I.S.S., and life with Russian Cosmonauts and the Russian Space Federation''s role in getting pilots up to the I.S.S.. His... See more
Great book by one of the most experienced astronauts! Scott has so much to tell, and I enjoyed all of the details of life in space aboard the I.S.S., and life with Russian Cosmonauts and the Russian Space Federation''s role in getting pilots up to the I.S.S..

His astronaut twin-brother Mark was the one whose wife (Gabby Giffords, AZ Representative) got shot by the maniac in AZ. He covers that too. The fact that Mark and Scott are both astronauts (and twins) is stranger than fiction, and I loved reading about how Scott became an astronaut, a storyline that alternates between his progress from childhood, his lapse of focus, his inspiration to get on track—all beautifully interwoven with his more recent recollection of past missions. One can learn a lot from this book, as well as simply sating one''s curiosity about the glitz and glamour of being an astronaut, along with the loneliness, the physical toll and the sheer distance from everyone you love. Highly recommended! Space geeks will love it, but everyone can be inspired by this man''s life and experience to-date.

I''ve also read biographies about Neil Armstrong and Alan Shepard. Reading Buzz Aldrin and Chris Hadfield next!
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Real Happy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What a fascinating story.
Reviewed in the United States on October 24, 2018
Well done Scott Kelly, well done. Scott shares his whole life within these pages. Everything from growing up in New Jersey, his marriages, his travels, military career, and his time in space. I learned so much from reading this book. I thought his stories were... See more
Well done Scott Kelly, well done.
Scott shares his whole life within these pages. Everything from growing up in New Jersey, his marriages, his travels, military career, and his time in space. I learned so much from reading this book. I thought his stories were exciting, and I didn’t want to put this book down.

Here’s a few things that caught my attention.

The chapters in this book don’t have any titles, and Scott, the author, jumped from one time period to another, so that confused me at first, but then it became easier and kind of neat to get different perspectives of his life.

I was amazed and surprised that Scott did so poorly in school and was able to buckle down and do the work needed to make him eligible to be an astronaut.

I was so encouraged how the Americans and Russians put their differences aside and worked together and became true friends; in addition, there were many differences in their equipment, procedures and expectations.
For example, “The Russian space agency has a much different system for compensating their cosmonauts than we do: Their base salaries are much lower, but they get paid bonuses for each day they fly in space. (I get only five dollars per diem, but my base salary is much better.) However, their bonuses are decreased whenever they make “mistakes,” those mistakes defined rather arbitrarily. I suspect that complaining, even making very legitimate complaints, can be defined as a mistake, costing them money and, potentially, the chance to fly in space again.” This seems very risky.

I’m so excited about the experiments they are doing on the space station. Scott Kelly told us that he was involved in over 400 different experiments during his stay and most of them dealt with effects of gravity, but the life changing results of these experiments are well worth the expense. These include learning about aging, our vision, cardiovascular health, and so much more. The list of experiments they are doing in space is way too long to include, but I would encourage you to read this book. It’s so worth it.

On the lighter side, one of the astronauts even brought his bagpipe with him and woke up Scott one morning playing his bagpipe and Scoot loved it. Scott also loves classical music and brought his iPad with him to listen to Mozart, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Struss to name a few. Scott also lived in Russia for a couple of years at Star City, which is Russia’s John F Kennedy’s Space Center equivalent.

I never realized how many sites NASA had such as Ames in California, Glenn in Ohio, Goddard in Maryland, Michoud in Louisiana, Marshall in Alabama, headquarters in D.C., Kennedy in Florida.

Regarding Mars, Scott shared that 2033 is a reasonable launch date for Mars, but that is not set in stone and needs to be continuously updated.

In conclusion, I want to share this quote from Scoot Kelly that touched me. “I always think about what it meant to me to read The Right Stuff as a young man. I feel certain that I wouldn’t have done any of the things I have if I hadn’t read that book—if Tom Wolfe hadn’t written it. On a quiet Saturday afternoon, I called Tom Wolfe to thank him. He sounded truly amazed to hear from me.” Books change lives for the better. I wish more people loved books as much as I love books.
4 people found this helpful
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Michael W. Pierce
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
ENDURANCE is a story for the ages.
Reviewed in the United States on July 26, 2018
When Scott Kelly decided he was going to write a book he contacted Tom Wolfe, author of THE RIGHT STUFF, the book that inspired Kelly to become an astronaut. Kelly asked Wolfe how he should begin. “Begin at the beginning,” was Wolfe’s reply. And so... See more
When Scott Kelly decided he was going to write a book he contacted Tom Wolfe, author of THE RIGHT STUFF, the book that inspired Kelly to become an astronaut. Kelly asked Wolfe how he should begin.

“Begin at the beginning,” was Wolfe’s reply.

And so Scott Kelly begins with his life growing up in New Jersey as the twin of his astronaut brother Mark. His parents, both liquor addicted police officers, were still inspirations to the burgeoning astronaut. Especially his mother, who was able to set goals and meet them, even at the hands of an abusive husband.

Scott was an uninspired student through most of his high school years, and then he picked up a copy of Wolfe’s book, which is the story of the original Mercury astronauts. He was hooked.

Kelly knew his grades would never get him into the Naval Academy at Annapolis, but they were good enough to get him into the Merchant Marine Academy, which was good enough to get him into the Navy. He became a pilot, and that led to becoming a test pilot, and that led to NASA. His first Space Shuttle mission was in December 1999, when he was pilot of Discovery STS-103, an eight day service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope.

In 2012 Kelly was selected for a 340 day mission aboard the International Space Station, a mission that began in March 2015 and ended in March 2016. He retired in April of the same year.

Kelly has written a very engaging book about his life and his life in space, and the havoc that space travel wreaks on a human body. Kelly writes how his first marriage ended in divorce, hinting that marital infidelity on his part might have been one of the causes of that failure.

Kelly is at his best when he writes about his life on earth. From a failing, uninspired student to becoming a paramedic, to becoming a test pilot and then an astronaut, he has written an inspiring story. It’s not an ‘if I can do it, you can do it’ type of story. Rather, it’s a story of overcoming the obstacles in your path and achieving your goals.

His writing of his life in space is also quite interesting. I think we all realize how dangerous space travel can be, but I never realized how much of a toll it takes on an astronaut’s body. It affects their vision. It affects their neuromuscular structure. Too much inhalation of elevated carbon dioxide can lead to the bends, the same condition that afflicts divers. We now know that, thanks to medical tests performed on Scott and his astronaut twin brother Mark, that it also affects their DNA, as Scott’s is now slightly different than Mark’s. The research into how his year in space affected his body will go on for years.

Scott Kelly has written a very good memoir, with just enough tension to make readers feel like they’re riding a missile into space alongside him. It also reminds us that, with enough hard work, we can attain the goals we set for ourselves.

To keep up with Scott Kelly’s story, follow him on Twitter at NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly
3 people found this helpful
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Kallie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great book!
Reviewed in the United States on January 31, 2018
I have always been interested in our space program, NASA activities, and in our astronauts. Seeing them taking off sends chills up and down my spine, along with a few prayers. The moonwalk was something incredible! What was missing for me was an actual knowledge of... See more
I have always been interested in our space program, NASA activities, and in our astronauts. Seeing them taking off sends chills up and down my spine, along with a few prayers. The moonwalk was something incredible!
What was missing for me was an actual knowledge of what really happens in space when they are there. Scott Kelly did a great job in describing every aspect of being an astronaut, and dangers involved. I was especially interested in his year in space, and he provided an excellent description of that. What made it really moving were his chapters of personal life, his family, his twin brother, the horror of days when his sister-in-law was shot, his thoughts about many things affecting us all. Could not put that book down.
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Frequent Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Worth Reading if Interested in Space Programme - and how Individual Became Part of it
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 16, 2018
Book Review An interesting read. Much can be learned from this book. I acquired this book on the basis of extracts in newspapers and favourable reviews. The matter-of-fact tone and absence of hyperbole appealed. The book is however not without flaws. The writing is at times...See more
Book Review An interesting read. Much can be learned from this book. I acquired this book on the basis of extracts in newspapers and favourable reviews. The matter-of-fact tone and absence of hyperbole appealed. The book is however not without flaws. The writing is at times clichéd and the language sometimes used would probably make many consider the book unsuitable for children. The editing is occasionally deficient (eg p290 "we must past (sic) oral exams") and a glossary would be helpful - many abbreviations and acronyms are used. The CDRA (carbon dioxide removal assembly) is introduced and frequently referred to afterwards - but if the meaning of the abbreviation is forgotten, there''s no direct reference to CDRA in the index. The author advises that CDRA is pronounced "Seedra" and then uses that spelling extensively throughout the book. There''s no direct reference to that in the index either. Incidentally a former editor himself (very strongly) argues that notwithstanding pronunciation, CDRA should be spelt CDRA and not Seedra! I found the structure disconcerting - in fairness, other reviewers have not. The book switches without warning from space to to the author''s history and back again. For example, I found I was so engrossed in naval air operations that I''d quite forgotten the part of the space programme from which the book had suddenly changed, when it equally suddenly returned to it! It is said that every man is the hero of his own story. The author contradicts this somewhat. While of course, his absolutely undoubted bravery emerges throughout the book, so do other aspects of his character and conduct - and the costs his ambition to be an astronaut inflicted. This is arguably one of the strengths of his account. Overall, a worthwhile read. In many respects I found the author''s naval experiences among the most interesting parts of the book. That said, I also learned a great deal about space operations.
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David Duckworth
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Grounded
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 24, 2020
Firstly, what did I dislike about this book - well, the fact that I finished reading it, it ran out, there is no more! I could have read again and again about each moment, incident and emotion shared for much much longer. Who to recommend it to.....anyone that has an...See more
Firstly, what did I dislike about this book - well, the fact that I finished reading it, it ran out, there is no more! I could have read again and again about each moment, incident and emotion shared for much much longer. Who to recommend it to.....anyone that has an interest in human endeavour, scientific fact or a respect for achievement. The fact is this book not only chronicles Astronaut Scott Kelly and his journey but stands as testament to all those whom have contributed to mankind’s quest for cosmic knowledge especially those that sacrificed their lives so that others will benefit. His descriptions are really open, from wanting to smell fresh-cut grass again to the hurt of wearing a space suit. Read it.
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kipling 1951
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 6, 2018
Fantastic read. Thoroughly enjoyed this book and will re-read it again at some stage. Written honestly, funny and endearing at times. Lots of different elements in this book that will appeal to anyone interested in space exploration but also the human everyday challenges of...See more
Fantastic read. Thoroughly enjoyed this book and will re-read it again at some stage. Written honestly, funny and endearing at times. Lots of different elements in this book that will appeal to anyone interested in space exploration but also the human everyday challenges of astronauts. Buy it, you will not be disappointed.
4 people found this helpful
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Jelly
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Found it hard to put down
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 6, 2020
I am not really into space but caught a tv interview with Scott once and became interested when I learned how he changed his outlook on study. So this is the first space book I have read. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about these very unique experiences and would highly...See more
I am not really into space but caught a tv interview with Scott once and became interested when I learned how he changed his outlook on study. So this is the first space book I have read. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about these very unique experiences and would highly recommend it to any other non space orientated person as it highlights what can be achieved when you really want something.
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Mrs. K. Graham
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Congratulations Scott Kelly
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 6, 2018
Excellent book. Well written. I couldn''t put it down it was so exciting and very informative. I learned so much about space that I had never even thought about and now appreciate life on Earth much more----really makes you think of how much we take for granted. I would...See more
Excellent book. Well written. I couldn''t put it down it was so exciting and very informative. I learned so much about space that I had never even thought about and now appreciate life on Earth much more----really makes you think of how much we take for granted. I would strongly recommend this book and would like to wish Scott Kelly a happy life on Earth.
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